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18/Sep/2020

Then sit somewhere where you are not facing the tele screen. This acts as a visual distraction and reduces your ability to lip read.

If one ear is better than the other ear ( better hearing in one ear) position the seating so that the talker in on the better side.

If possible choose the wall seat or padded booth. Position yourself in a way that you sit with your back to rest of the room. Very important if you have hearing aids already. Will assist the directional mics in your aids to perform better.

Need more information call My Audiologist on 07 34465845


18/Sep/2020

Australia has a long history of addressing hearing healthcare, with pioneering projects and research. SBS reports that the Hearing Care Industry Association (HCIA) of Australia has commissioned an evidence-based report, developed by Deloitte Access Economics, on the social and economic cost of hearing loss in the country: Social and Economic Cost of Hearing Health in Australia – June 2017. It estimates that around 3.6 million Australians are currently affected by hearing loss. This represents an economic cost of AUD 15.9 billion as a result of premature retirement and decreased productivity.

By 2060, it is estimated that as many as one in five Australians (over 7 million people), will be living with a hearing issue. The highest risk group is reported to be those aged 12 to 35. Another estimate is that up to 50% of young Australians may develop hearing loss after five years of exposure to loud music.

“The significant increase in the prevalence of hearing loss shown in this report raises challenges for the hearing care industry on how we can best support and mitigate the impact on the Australian population,” says HCIA’s chairman, Mr Ashley Wilson. According to the article, HCIA also recommends that Australia’s hearing aid voucher programme be extended to people in low-income groups, including younger and older Australians.


18/Sep/2020

 

Itchy ears
A common complaint we often see patients for are itchy ears. The don’t hurt or drain… They just itch… a lot…There are a few common causes of such itchy ears including earwaxallergies, and a piece of hair in the ear canal. However, there are a few other etiologies which are not often considered.Ear Canal DermatitisYes… the skin of your ear canal can become dry and irritated (just like the hands after washing your hands too often). People sometimes complain of very dry flaky earwax with this condition, similar to the dry flaky skin of psoriasis.Treatment is easy… steroids! Whether it be in cream form (elicon, triamcinolone) or drops (dermotic). For those a bit wary of using steroids, one can try facial lotion, mineral oil, or sweet oil.

Fungal Otitis Externa

Also known as thrush of the ears. This often happens when antibiotics are given repeatedly over time for an “ear infection” whether in ear drop or oral pill form. Pain may be present, but even with pain, the adjective itchy is always included.

Treatment is also a snap… anti-fungal cream! We like to use lotrisone for this condition. However, the other key to successful treatment is complete debridement of the ear canal prior to cream insertion. Also, when the cream is used, one needs to completely fill the ear canal from eardrum to ear canal entrance.

Often, one single treatment is all that is required!

Worst comes to worst, antifungal powder can be tried.

 


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18/Sep/2020

One of the more challenging listening situations for individuals with a hearing loss is trying to communicate in a restaurant. Even the most elegant restaurants tend to be on the noisy side. Numerous conversations are going on all around you, dishes and silverware are constantly clanging and music is playing in the background. And being in a seated position eliminates your ability to move closer to the person or persons you want to hear.
Plan ahead by picking a quieter restaurant. For example, unless you’re content to read the captioning on the televisions, avoid sports bars.
Try to find carpeted restaurants that have chairs with rollers on the legs (helps to prevent an annoying scraping sound when they are moved), plants, and sound absorbent materials on the tables and walls.
Make reservations ahead of time, and ask for accommodations.
Go to your favourite restaurants, so you already know their specialities and options, such as choices of salad dressings or side dishes.
Look on the restaurants website to preview the menu.
Choose to dine with a smaller number of dining partners.
Pick a table in the least noisy part of the restaurant (e.g., away from the kitchen, bar, wait service stations, etc.).
Ask for seating in a well-lit area.
Remember that even people with normal hearing experience greater difficulty in a noisy listening environment than they do in a quiet listening environment. So, dont expect to do as well with your hearing aids in the noisy restaurant as you do in the quiet of your home.
Sit with your back to the window, so that lighting is on the speakers face, not in your eyes.
Request that staff turn down background music (you are probably not the only patron bothered by the volume of the music).
When possible, indicate choices before youre asked. Examples: Id like a salad with Italian dressing or I would like a burger, no fries.
Ask the waiter/waitress for a printed list of the specials of the day.
If restaurant dining is for business, request to meet in a quieter location.
Enjoying the company of your friends and family is important to your well being. By following the tips above and with a little pre-planning, dining out can be more of a pleasure and less of a burden. Do all that you can to ensure that your dining experience, at least the listening part is a great one.


shutterstock_269925053-1200x800.jpg
18/Sep/2020

One of the more challenging listening situations for individuals with a hearing loss is trying to communicate in a restaurant. Even the most elegant restaurants tend to be on the noisy side. Numerous conversations are going on all around you, dishes and silverware are constantly clanging and music is playing in the background. And being in a seated position eliminates your ability to move closer to the person or persons you want to hear.
Plan ahead by picking a quieter restaurant. For example, unless you’re content to read the captioning on the televisions, avoid sports bars.
Try to find carpeted restaurants that have chairs with rollers on the legs (helps to prevent an annoying scraping sound when they are moved), plants, and sound absorbent materials on the tables and walls.
Make reservations ahead of time, and ask for accommodations.
Go to your favourite restaurants, so you already know their specialities and options, such as choices of salad dressings or side dishes.
Look on the restaurants website to preview the menu.
Choose to dine with a smaller number of dining partners.
Pick a table in the least noisy part of the restaurant (e.g., away from the kitchen, bar, wait service stations, etc.).
Ask for seating in a well-lit area.
Remember that even people with normal hearing experience greater difficulty in a noisy listening environment than they do in a quiet listening environment. So, dont expect to do as well with your hearing aids in the noisy restaurant as you do in the quiet of your home.
Sit with your back to the window, so that lighting is on the speakers face, not in your eyes.
Request that staff turn down background music (you are probably not the only patron bothered by the volume of the music).
When possible, indicate choices before youre asked. Examples: Id like a salad with Italian dressing or I would like a burger, no fries.
Ask the waiter/waitress for a printed list of the specials of the day.
If restaurant dining is for business, request to meet in a quieter location.
Enjoying the company of your friends and family is important to your well being. By following the tips above and with a little pre-planning, dining out can be more of a pleasure and less of a burden. Do all that you can to ensure that your dining experience, at least the listening part is a great one.


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